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Author Topic: The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project  (Read 2317 times)

Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #45 on: March 27, 2017, 07:29:04 PM »
7/19/15

I've been posting quite a few test pieces recently, so I don't want to confuse people as to the nature of the project.

The workflow is as follows:

1. Pencil sketch of Chip and Dale (foreground)
2. Pencil sketch of background

3. Vector trace of #1 from scanned sketch, printed to transparency-> inked foreground cel
4. Vector trace of #2 from scanned sketch, printed to transparency-> inked background cel

5. Hand painting of #3 with acrylic paints-> completed color foreground cel
6. Hand painting of #4 with acrylic paints-> completed color background cel

7. Place #5 on top of #6, flatten with glass. Photograph cels with 35mm camera using color reversal (slide) film.
8. Final output of project is developed and mounted 35mm slide. 4800 DPI PNG scan will be used for digital distribution. Scan of slide is approximately 6000x4000 pixels. I also plan on having a large print of the scan made so I can hang it on my wall.
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Offline Chipster-roo

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #46 on: March 28, 2017, 02:49:22 PM »
I like how you provide detailed descriptions with each picture, it's interesting to read more about the process.

The finished foreground is really amazing :)

It's going to be interesting to see the background.
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Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #47 on: March 28, 2017, 03:14:08 PM »
Thanks! I am glad you are enjoying learning about the process. It's fascinating stuff and I enjoyed posting what I learned as I went, as this was all new to me.

I appreciate the compliments about my foreground drawing of the boys (i.e. Chip and Dale). They are really cute, aren't they? <3 What I have posted so far are digital color tests and inked cel tests. Wait until you see the real thing....

« Last Edit: March 28, 2017, 03:14:22 PM by singhcr »
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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #48 on: March 29, 2017, 02:25:18 PM »
This is as awesome as I remembered it being (if not more) :)

Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #49 on: March 29, 2017, 05:19:22 PM »
7/19/15

I've been looking at some of the old Disney documentary films back in the ink and paint days.

For example, a full length Disney feature has approximately 200,000 hand drawn, inked, and painted cels. All must be photographed one at a time and one scene can have several cels stacked on top of each other, depending on the complexity of that shot. During the early days they were filmed on 3-strip Technicolor, which we should all be thankful for. Walt Disney was always pushing the envelope in terms of technology, making color films far earlier than anyone else. The dye based negatives cannot fade, and the color is saturated, vibrant, and very, very detailed. In short, they are simply gorgeous. As for more modern film-based features like CDRR, don't worry: even Eastmancolor films have B&W separation masters, which cannot fade. If stored in the correct conditions, they can last nearly 100 years.

From this, it appears that feature films used watercolor for backgrounds, so they were done on paper. I watched a bit of CDRR and Tale Spin today and wasn't sure if the backgrounds were acrylic or not. They appear to be, but I'm not sure. Can anyone confirm this one way or the other?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=au5W_CPLP2Y

Ink & Paint and final photography around 5:15-5:58 mark.

A more modern video demonstrating how to paint cels. I guess I need to push and pull the paint around and not touch the cel to avoid scratching it with the brush. The more I delve into this stuff, the more respect and admiration I have for all of these talented people who worked so hard to make our favorite films and TV shows.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ftF7Cs8KLgQ

Painting starts around 1:54.
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Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #50 on: March 29, 2017, 05:19:54 PM »
Silverweed: Thanks!

7/20/15

Another cool cel painting video....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZovtYQSSac

The Technicolor dye transfer printing process. Technicolor prints do not fade, making them invaluable historical color references and look exactly as the audience would see them upon a premiere. It has a unique vibrancy that cannot be matched, even when watching a digital version of a Technicolor film. I have yet to have the pleasure of seeing a genuine print, as they are rare collectibles now.

http://eastman.org/technicolor/technology/dye-transfer-printing

Update: I was able to see a rare 35mm Technicolor print of The Wizard of Oz. That was mind blowing. It had the most intensely saturated colors that I have ever seen. I imagine I will never see such a thing again. It was just plain gorgeous and something that I will always remember and treasure.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2017, 05:21:05 PM by singhcr »
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Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #51 on: March 29, 2017, 05:20:14 PM »
7/20/15

Background Cel Inking

It begins....


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Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #52 on: March 29, 2017, 05:20:30 PM »
7/20/15

Here we are! This wolf is picking up speed.... :)


« Last Edit: March 29, 2017, 05:20:50 PM by singhcr »
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Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #53 on: March 29, 2017, 05:21:41 PM »
7/28/15

BAM! Done. :)

I had to recompose the background a bit to fit my intended 1.50:1 aspect ratio.

On to the next step.




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Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #54 on: March 29, 2017, 05:22:33 PM »
7/28/15

I talked to a professional animator about the paints and media used for background art.

Quote from: "WDTAProject"on 
To answer your question on the backgrounds: usually backgrounds are done on regular drawing paper (150gr/m) with gouache paint. Acrylic of watercolors are used quite seldom, but almost everything you saw on screen was gouache. The first thing that I noticed scanning the backgrounds, was the smell of gouache that still was very strong after thirty years of storage. However, some backgrounds are partly cels and acrylic, which were used to create more depth and for panning shots.
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Offline Hawkbit

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #55 on: April 02, 2017, 01:29:26 PM »
@ Chris Singh

This is really amazing.  I just happened to stumble on it as I was walking around the ol' place.   Glad I did!  I love the old Chip 'n Dale shorts from Disney.  Its amazing the amount of work you put in to make this is as good as possible.  If you left this to me, I'd pencil sketch it, darken in the outlines, color it in with color pencil, and call it a day! :p  I don't have the proper tools to go for digital art, and I'm too tired by the of the night to be a "nighttime artist".

I look forward to the finished product and will keep watch on this thread now that I'm aware of it.

Offline singhcr

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« Reply #56 on: April 03, 2017, 01:49:00 AM »
Thanks, Hawkbit! I honestly am dumbfounded when people say I take a lot of time and effort to do things well. That's how I approach everything that I am interested in and I enjoy it so much that it doesn't seem like work a lot of the time. But every once in a while I can step back and see what I've poured my heart and soul into.

If you wanted you can do this without digital tools. That was going to be my initial approach. I prefer to do things as traditionally as I can. Other than the inking, everything is by hand and all analog. In my case I found the digital inking approach gave the best results, but it's not the only way to do it. An inexpensive light box and a nice ink pen works too. :)



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Offline singhcr

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The Chip and Dale Animation Cel Project
« Reply #57 on: April 04, 2017, 01:55:38 AM »
8/2/15

Step 3: Cel Painting

Now we come to the really fun part: painting!

I’m going to use the same acrylic paints that I bought for my 3D printed Chip project. This time, I’m not going to cheap out on the brushes. The cheap synthetic ones I bought barely lasted for that one figurine. Even partway through the bristles were already sagging and not holding their shape. This time, I’m going to get nice ones because other than the initial sketch this is the most detail intensive portion of the project and I don't want to cut any corners here.

After some consultation with our resident brush expert Saraggle91 and some research of my own, I've decided to go with Windsor & Newton Monarch synthetic mongoose brushes. They have a good amount of stiffness for acrylic work. I'm getting several round and filbert style brushes so I have a variety of sizes to choose from.

Here is a taste of what I am after. This is from Bonkers. Thanks to Ramdale for the picture.


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Offline singhcr

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« Reply #58 on: April 04, 2017, 01:56:12 AM »
9/7/15

Color Mixing

I have a number of custom colors to create for Chip and Dale’s fur, the peanut shells, etc. I have no experience doing this so I needed a lot of help figuring out color theory. You could view this as an unfortunate obstacle to completing my project, or thinking that color theory/matching is another interesting and useful skill to learn. I prefer the latter mindset. :)

Thankfully, my mother is an accomplished artist and has some experience here. I very much enjoyed this as it’s a bonding experience from artist to artist and mother to son. Special thanks must also go to Saraggle91 (how many times do I have to keep mentioning this? :P) for her assistance here as well. Artists keep coming out of the wood works to help me and I am very appreciative of that.





Color Tinting and Shading

That’s all well and good, but how do I match my paint to a known sample?

Let me walk you through an example. I want to create a custom paint mix to match the boys' outer fur as seen on the pins. I chose the burnt sienna color as it was the closest.

Tint allows you to add white to brighten the color.
Shading allows you to add black to darken it.
Hue allows you to add color shifts using the three primary colors or any combination of them.

I added white to tint the paint until the color was bright enough, but if you look at the pin their fur has a red hue to it. I added bits of red and yellow until I got what I wanted.

Also, I learned how to clean and maintain my paint brushes. Like any tool, they should be treated with respect and they will reward you with years of faithful service.

Winsor and Netwon's Care and Cleaning of Brushes
How to Clean Brushes

Do not use a paintbrush to mix a great deal of paint! It will destroy the bristles. I used my cheap brushes as a test and I was stressing them a lot. A pallet knife is best suited for this purpose.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2017, 01:56:38 AM by singhcr »
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Offline singhcr

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« Reply #59 on: April 04, 2017, 01:58:38 AM »
9/7/15

Cel Painting Test #1

The paint is mixed. Let's give it a shot.


I have heard that cel painting is a "puddle, push, and pull" process. You puddle up paint on the cel and push and pull it with your brush, and the bristles never touch the cel itself. Paint is always applied to the back of the cel so you don't paint over the ink lines. It is an unusual painting technique that is not intuitive at all.



I'm laying it on rather thick, as you can see.




I checked the front of the cel and it didn't appear to get very good coverage. I tried watering down the paint to the point where it started to flow a bit and made very gentle pushes with my brush, taking care not to spread it too thin. You can see this on Chip's peanut.



Here is the front of the cel. It started out poorly but I improved a lot by the end.



So here's what I learned from my first shot at cel painting:

1. It is not easy. I repeat: it is NOT easy. I have a tremendous amount of respect for the ink and paint people who worked on CDRR. You'd think it would be a simple matter of brushing paint onto a cel but it requires a deft touch and a lot of skill. I'll get there eventually.

2. Acrylic paint is way too viscous out of the tube for this kind of application. The paint was not flowing and spreading evenly across the cel until I made it very thin. I will keep trying with my acrylics for a bit longer. There is also a company that sells special "cel vinyl" acrylic paint just for cel painting that does not change its color when it dries. It is expensive, but I am considering that option too as it's ready to go right away save for any custom colors I'd have to mix up.

3. I am going to buy a small light box so I can easily see when I am achieving proper coverage and when I am not. It will speed up my learning process significantly.

I put this off for a while as I thought I couldn't do it. I thought I would fail. Today I was feeling confident and wanted to try. If you never try, you can never succeed. I was quite impressed with all of the progress I have made on this project so far. That usually doesn't happen as I often downplay what I am good at. When you are passionate about something, it doesn't seem like work. You just do it. It doesn't seem special or impressive.

It is only now that it is dawning on me how ambitious this project really was when I first dreamed about it. I significantly challenged and improved my sketching skills and had to learn how cels are created, digital inking, and now, color theory and cel painting. I did that all by myself through trial and error. It's really happening, folks! I am painting a real animation cel that I created from scratch all on my own, less than a year after I started with my first crude Chip drawing! I feel like a real artist and that is something I've sought my entire life. The end game is in sight and nothing is going to stop me now.  :)
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