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Author Topic: The Film and series as adaptations  (Read 4679 times)

Offline Keith

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The Film and series as adaptations
« on: October 06, 2012, 01:45:46 PM »
When I first saw the film, I thought it was the best animated movie ever made. It's story was great, the characters were likable and interesting, and it was unlike any animated movie I've ever seen. I grew up with movies like The Land Before Time, The Lion King, Bambi etc. To come across a movie like this seemed like a miracle. But there were a few unexplained things in the movie like Cowslip's Warren, what was the deal with that place? What happened after Woundwort leaped at the dog? When I found out there was a book, I went right onto Amazon and ordered it. When I read it the first time, I went right back and read the whole thing again. It is the best book I've ever read, there's probably a lot of better books out there but I don't care.
Then I went to watch the movie again and..... let me tell you it was not as good when I watched it that time. What I watched this time seemed like a rushed film without much character development and absolutely no buildup. And some of the changes they made were pointless and made some characters like Keehar have no purpose. Now, I don't hate the film, I still like it, but I just can't help but feel disapointed every time I watch it.

The series on the other hand, I never feel the least bit disapointed. That may be because I thought the series was going to be an utter pile of crap but it actually turned out to be quite good. But I think straying further from the novel works to its advantage, it leaves very little to compare to in the novel when it just goes off and does its own thing, leaving very little room for disapointment. While the film being so close to the book works against it. If the film had been maybe a half an hour longer, it could have definately been better. But as it is, I prefer the series as an adaptation.

What do you guys think of the film and series as adaptations?
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Offline Hawkbit

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2012, 01:23:00 AM »
It's late now, but I'll be sure to respond tomorrow or Monday. :)

Offline Embemxrabbit

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2012, 07:02:56 AM »
Definitively the series! Though the book and movie are still special to me, and personally I loved the movie just as much as the book, but that may be because I just don't love them as much as the series, which I focuse on
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Offline Hawkbit

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2012, 01:21:44 PM »
Ok, time to reply.

I think this situation depends on the order in which you read/view the media.  My path to WSD, I read the book first....found it to be a great story.  Then I found the sequel book, read that...thought it was kind of meh compared to the first.  Then I decided to watch the film, and I didn't think it was that bad, when you consider book-to-film adaptations.  There are far worse out there.  TV series I really hadn't watched until maybe two years ago....the thought of a Disney-looking tv series didn't appeal to me for many years and I stayed far away from it.  I only recently have watched all three seasons and there was definite cause for some concern....a good chunk of season 2 is fluff, but the first and third seasons were quite good, and because they move beyond the books, there's less to be disappointed about.  I actually like season 3 the most.

So it possible to like everything....sure is.  I think if you watch the media first, and then read the book, you're bound to be more disappointed with the media adaptations because the book is just that much better when you compare similar stories.  If you read the book, then watch the media, knowing full well that it won't be a direct adaptation, you're prepared for differences, and are less disappointed as such in most cases.

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Then I went to watch the movie again and..... let me tell you it was not as good when I watched it that time. What I watched this time seemed like a rushed film without much character development and absolutely no buildup. And some of the changes they made were pointless and made some characters like Keehar have no purpose. Now, I don't hate the film, I still like it, but I just can't help but feel disapointed every time I watch it.

Just my two cents here...when Animal Logic adapted the Guardians of Gahoole, they messed up the plot more than Rosen ever did with WSD.  You can't turn 400 pages into a spectacular 90 minute film....a lot would have to be cut.  The addition of Violet was simply to point out that there were no does on WSD--and that would make more sense to those who had never read the book to see the doe carried off.  Keehar still has plenty of purpose--to find does, and that's exactly how the book goes if memory serves correctly.  The only part I can agree is really rushed is Bigwig's time in Efrafa--looks like a day in the film, if that at all--but again, time what it is, its got to move.  Kudos to what Rosen did do right, because it could always be far worse!

Offline Kornblume

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2012, 06:28:27 PM »
I first saw the movie when I was a kid, and it scared me senseless. But I loved it anyway. My mom always told me when it was on tv so I could see it, they shew it quite often. Years later I saw the series on tv and I also loved it, it didn´t matter to me that it was so different. About this time they also made the magazine that I loved to read. As a kid I didn´t know there was a book, but when I read about it, I bought it immediately. No surprise - I also loved it xD  I watched the series in German and English, and they are both very good versions. I like it that in the series the characters look more different from each other. The movie still creeps me out.

My fave version of "bright eyes" is the one in the movie, and Keehars German voice is also a lil better in the film, but in the end I think, they are all more than worthy to watch/read.
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Offline Dandelion

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2012, 03:25:08 PM »
I just watched the movie, and overall, the movie is more accurate, it looks absolutely beautiful, pays plenty of attention to detail. However, the series has a certain charm that you don't get in the movie, with the animation, the uniqueness of the characters. Overall though, I would have to say the movie.
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Offline Hawkbit

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2012, 08:05:36 PM »
The biggest difference is the series had more time to play with the plot.  90 minutes versus 260....no competition as to which had the better shot to adapt the book.  Yet the film did it better.  The tv series starts on the journey without much rhyme or reason as to why you're on the journey (hope you read the book!).  Keehar screaming "Piss off!" to kiddie Pipkin would've been hilarious if you could see him go back to Bigwig and ask what it means to piss off. :p  The series did better when it didn't have to follow the book and could make its own trail.

Offline Clover

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2012, 02:50:16 AM »
Quote from: Hawkbit on Oct 7 2012, 09:21:44 AM
when Animal Logic adapted the Guardians of Gahoole, they messed up the plot more than Rosen ever did with WSD.
I prefered the movie to the first five books but six through fifteen I prefered to the movie. But the reason for the plot being different (save for the first few minutes; Soren/Gylfie captured, St. Aggie's, meeting Twilight/Digger, etc.), was because Warner Bros. wanted it to be a family movie and Zack Snyder wanted to make it more aimed for teenagers and adults like the books. I read this somewhere but I can't seem to be able to find it again no matter how many hours I spend on google. :frustrated But I would have liked the movie more than I did (hard to believe for me) if it was more violent like the books and like most of Zack Snyder's other movies (before Legend of the Guardians he had only made rated R movies and then one PG-13 after Legend of the Guardians). But to me the first 3, maybe 4 books, were kind of confusing in what was happening (such as when Finny pushed Hortense from the ledge, I didn't even know it happened until I read that page 7 or 8 times), and the description of Boron and Barran's death's in book 8 was kind of...I'm not sure what the word is.

Maybe its beacuse I heard of the movie before the books (because of a friend who didn't hear of the books until I decided to look up the movie on wikipedia, who said I should watch the movie because I've seen Happy Feet and the remake of Dawn of the Dead), and it was about a month later when I decided to read the books.

I would stay on topic with Watership Down but I have to get off now.

Offline Darkling Nocturnal

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2013, 07:31:54 AM »
Of course, the books are unreachable. I like both. I think, "Tales..." is a good addendum AND a good sequel to the first book.

The movie got a style that is very rare and now, you see nearly no movies in that style.

But the series is the one, I prefer. Of course, I was a little bit unsettled, when I saw the style. But now, I find it really classical. It evocatives me of "The Animals of Farthing Wood". A group of animals must leave their home and find a new one. In their new home, there's trouble with the neighbours (Woundwort in WSD, Scarface in TAoFW).

But in direct comparison, WSD got more depth than TAoFW. Think of the structure in Efrafa (General - Captains - Corporals - Slaves), the different warrens. The whole story is more epic - from the journey to Watership down til the last battle against Darkhaven.

So I would say, the series can't compare with the book, but it's a very good alternative version of the story.


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Offline Indi-Rah

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2013, 07:24:14 PM »
I loved and adored the book and have read it four times. I'm currently looking for my copy so I can read it again. The movie was an excellent adaption and upon watching it I enjoyed it like no other movie. Sure, I found the wrong version on youtube(Someone added a full-length, one part HD version a week or two ago!), and the music was lackluster(If not extremely sticky), but I was instantly addicted when Hazel started moving around. I loved it. I found the snare scene a bit too calm - it's forgiveable though, since I imagine drawing Bigwig scrambling around and struggling, as the book depicted, would have been difficult. But all-in-all, I just loved it.
The series...
Oh Frith. Don't make me... Okay. Please don't get offended, since I'm the only one here who honestly disliked it.
I hated the series. Abhorred it. They slaughtered the characters of Bigwig, Kehaar, Woundwort(who I found less imposing), and Blackavar. It was awful. I didn't like what they did to Hyze- I mean, 'Primrose' either.


...Okay, so maybe the Primrose thing has something to do with the fact that I ship Hyzenthay with Bigwig...

But really! She was manipulative and put herself and Hazel in danger for NO REASON, since she likely knew that everyone was dead. Didn't the series say that Wouldwort had raided her warren?

I didn't watch far into the series, but I came at it desperately wanting to like it. I didn't mind the thought that it probably referred to does as more than burrow-diggers and kit-producers, nor that it probably avoided blood. But the progression through the first episode went something like this:

Opening. Okay, no problem... Wait... Why exactly are they started at the river? How's that make any sense? Is this the first episode? -*Double checks* - Alright, then. I know what's going on, though, so I guess that's find.

Introduce "Raspberry," what I refer to doe-Blackberry as in case buck-BLackberry come up. Okay... I can understand why, but they didn't have to use Blackberry.

Introduce Kehaar.
No.

I tried watching a few other episodes, and it really rubbed me the wrong way that they made Hazel the military tactician and made Bigwig, a pretty darn badass Officer, a complainer and dumb on the concept. Not only do I hold Bigwig as my supreme favorite character through any fandom, but it just feels awkward. Hazel had no time training for tactics, war, or military stuff - Bigwig did.

And the Blackavar-Campion issue. It was Blackavar who got the treatment of a broken military spirit, not Campion. It just bugged me.

And this: "Stop this war!!!" By Woundwort. Freaking. Woundwort. Just... no.
The movie, however, seemed perfectly paced to me. I think WsD should be done in TWO movies, really, one for the trip there and one involving Efrafa, the music helmed by Hans Zimmer and John Powell, but that's nitpicking. I loved the movie.
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Offline Hawkbit

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2013, 01:14:22 AM »
Sounds like you watched only Seasons 1 and 2.  If you can, watch Season 3.  Like I said earlier, the series did better when it didn't try to follow the book.  Season 3 is basically devoid of the books.

Offline Darkling Nocturnal

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« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2013, 05:36:54 AM »
Quote from: Hawkbit on May 18 2013, 09:14:22 PM
Sounds like you watched only Seasons 1 and 2.  If you can, watch Season 3.  Like I said earlier, the series did better when it didn't try to follow the book.  Season 3 is basically devoid of the books.
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Offline Darkling Nocturnal

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2013, 07:18:01 AM »
Quote from: Indi-Rah on May 16 2013, 03:24:14 PM
But really! She was manipulative and put herself and Hazel in danger for NO REASON, since she likely knew that everyone was dead. Didn't the series say that Wouldwort had raided her warren?
When you live imprisonment for years or maybe more than a half life, what's your deepest desire, you wanna be? The place, you called your home.

And when someone says, everything is dead and gone, someone, you never seen before in your life, did you hear what he says?

Of course, Woundworts army raided her warren (when I remember right). But after such a long time of imprisonment, the desire to visit your home place is stronger than rational thinking.


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Offline Myrkin

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The Film and series as adaptations
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2013, 10:27:07 AM »
IIRC Woundwort didn't raid Primrose's warren, but Vervain's raiding party caught her (somewhere outside Redstone probably) and brought her to Efrafa. If that was the case, then she could hope that everybody else back home was still alive, if Woundowort didn't learn where exactly did she come from.
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Offline Darkling Nocturnal

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« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2013, 10:43:06 AM »
That sounds plausible.

Woundwort didn't know, where Redstone lies til Cowslip told him.



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